Quick Answer: What Kind Of Doctor Treats Lupus Nephritis?

How is lupus nephritis diagnosed?

A biopsy — where your doctor removes a small section of kidney tissue for lab analysis — is the most definitive test for diagnosing lupus nephritis.

It can also help determine how severe your disease is..

Does lupus always show up in bloodwork?

No one test can diagnose lupus. The combination of blood and urine tests, signs and symptoms, and physical examination findings leads to the diagnosis.

What can you eat with lupus nephritis?

Eat small portions of protein-rich foods: Chicken. Fish. Red Meat….Be sure to talk to your doctor before making any changes to your diet.Lean cuts of meat.Skinless poultry.Fish.Beans.Vegetables.Fruits.Low-fat or fat-free milk, yogurt, and cheese.

What is lupus nephritis symptoms?

Signs and symptoms of lupus nephritis include:Blood in your urine.Foamy urine (due to excess protein in urine)High blood pressure.Swelling in your hands, ankles or feet.High levels of a waste product called creatinine in your blood.

What kind of doctor can diagnose lupus?

Start by seeing your family doctor and a rheumatologist, a doctor who specializes in the diseases of joints and muscles such as lupus. Depending on your symptoms or whether your organs have been hurt by your lupus, you may need to see other types of doctors.

Can lupus nephritis be cured?

There’s no cure for lupus nephritis. The goal of treatment is to keep the problem from getting worse. Stopping kidney damage early can prevent the need for a kidney transplant. Treatment can also provide relief from lupus symptoms.

Do Rheumatologists treat lupus?

Many people who have (or suspect they have) lupus see a rheumatologist (or pediatric rheumatologist if a child or teen). This type of doctor specializes in diagnosing and treating diseases of the joints and muscles.

What can lupus be mistaken for?

Autoimmune thyroid disease. Celiac disease. Myasthenia gravis.

How long can you live with lupus nephritis?

For people with lupus, some treatments can increase the risk of developing potentially fatal infections. However, the majority of people with lupus can expect a normal or near-normal life expectancy. Research has shown that many people with a lupus diagnosis have been living with the disease for up to 40 years.